Feature Friday: CreatedHere

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Issue #3 of CreatedHere Magazine – Photography: Brent Mccombs  Model: Katie McDonald Surface Design: Dee Wilkie 


1.) What is CreatedHere? (In a few sentences.) 

CreatedHere is a website and print magazine dedicated to showcasing NB creatives. On the site I share features, studio visits and blog posts, and I am also growing a directory of artists and craftspeople. Our province is so diverse so I try to have a good combination of Anglophone, Francophone and Aboriginal artists. I love meeting artists and telling their stories. I want to connect a community of people who love everything handmade and local and grow an appreciation for our artists.

2.) What inspired you to start CreatedHere?
I ran into an old friend who had become a glass artist since I last saw him. I wanted to ask him a hundred questions and find out his story. That piqued my interest and got me wondering about other artists’ stories. I couldn’t find a blog or website like I was picturing so I decided to start my own!

3.) What was the hardest part about starting your own magazine?
Not really knowing what I was doing except that I wanted to do it. Starting something like this feels risky, especially when no one has ever heard of you! Also time. When you have small children, free time is a hot commodity.

4.) What is it like balancing your work life and family life?
It’s a challenge because it often feels like there isn’t enough time to go around. I have to compartmentalize. I often work in the evenings when the kids are in bed, but I do have some day time when my mom or a friend can watch them. It is definitely hard work, but I love having a creative outlet. It means that I get to meet lots of neat people at a time in my life when I would otherwise be mostly hanging out with toddlers!

5.) How long has CreatedHere existed?
The site went live in September 2014, and the first magazine was printed in Spring 2015.

6.) Where would you like to see CreatedHere in the future? 
I want to see a consistent roll of stories on the site as well as a regular magazine going, with submissions from around the province. I’d love to see more variety in the content from other writers and photographers!  It’s my hope that people will look to CreatedHere as a go-to resource about NB artists and a way to get connected to their creative community.

If you want to check out more on CreatedHere, check out their facebook page here.

D.W.

 

Feature Friday: Laura McFarlane

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Photography: Nathanael Patriquin Model: Alyssa Yvette Corset: Laura McFarlane Surface Design: Dee Wilkie


How long does it typically take to make a corset?
A traditional corset can take about 40 or more hours depending on how much embellishment is desired, and hand sewing there is to be done. A traditional corset can also have ‘laminating’ which means that two inside layers of the corset are sewn together with several vertical lines of stitching for added structure. A fashion corset on the other hand can take closer to 10 to 20 hours of work because they often have more machine sewing and lamination is not neccessarily needed. The corset is not intended to be as structured, and is more for show than utility.

How much fabric is needed?
There are usually three to four layers of fabric in a corset, the outer ‘fashion fabric layer’, two layers of fabric into which the bones will be inserted, and sometimes another inner layer to add thickness and strength to the fashion fabric if it is a light fabric like silk or cotton. All together 2 to 3 meters of fabric can go into a typical corset.

Where did you learn to make them?
I graduated from the Fashion Design program at the New Brunswick College of Craft and Design in 2014. In the fashion program there is a course all about corsetry which teaches how to properly create a pattern, how to fit it properly, and how to sew a traditional style of corset.

What do you love most about making corsets?
I am a costumer, and have always loved the history of clothing, and undergarments and corsetry have evolved so much, but the historic look of corsets has been

What is the most frustrating part about making a corset?
It takes a lot of time to make one complete corset, and I will admit that I can get a little impatient. Usually I do a lot of hand stitching at the beginning and of end my corsets, and it is amazing how fast an evening can disappear when you’re hand stitching pieces together, or stitching down your edges.

What kind of details and embellishments can be added to a corset?
Piping the seams of a corset is a common embellishment, and can help to strengthen your seams. There is also a type of stitching embellishment called ‘flossing’ which is a technique of stitching at the top and/pr bottom of the bone channels. The stitching can be purely for decoration, but it is also used to better anchor the bones in place, and to add strength to the fabric which will make it less likely for the bones to eventually poke through the fabric over time. As modern fashion corsets go however, anything from lace to fringe, buttons, stubs and more can go into a corset.

When did corsets start in history and how are they used/worn today?
The corset was first introduced into fashion in the 16th century in Italy. They were worn to create a smooth tight cone shape to the torso, and to push the breasts up. Over hundreds of years many

different shape and technique changes occurred, including the addition of boning, which were commonly made from whalebone but are now either plastic or metal.

Today some people do still use corsets as a shaping undergarment, but now fashion corsets are much more popular and are worn as/or over clothing. Current costuming trends are also making corseting much more popular, such as Steampunk, which is inspired by the technology and aesthetic of the 19th century.

To check out more of Laura’s designs, check out her facebook page here.

Feature Friday: Anna Mathis

 

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Photo credit: Denise Rowe

Anna Mathis is an international award winner for her textile designs, a graduate of the New Brunswick College of Craft and Design, and has recently completed her Bachelor’s Degree in Adult Education at the University of New Brunswick. Mathis is the founder of Ploome Fiber Arts and enjoys being involved in the entrepreneurial community. Her work has been shown in galleries and shops across the Atlantic provinces, and her self-starter attitude has opened up opportunities to take her and her ideas from her hometown of Fredericton to Boston and India and back again. Mathis is passionate about sharing her craft through teaching workshops and selling fiber arts kits and supplies. Mathis has recently been exploring wearable fiber art and she has created unique felted necklaces, one-of-a-kind skirts and sculptural dresses, and a variety of woven wraps and naturally dyed scarves.

Dee Wilkie – The Art Project Does Jamaica: Heart Strings

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I am so in love with heartSTRINGS Jewelry!!  Each piece is so unique and is made out of both new and used guitar strings.  I wore this off and on during my entire trip in Jamaica and it was one of my favorite pieces.  I was worried that the wire which held the beads on it might get caught on my clothing, or scratch my skin.  It didn’t at all, and actually, I tried looking at my bracelet to see where the wire began and ended and I couldn’t find it.  The craftsman ship of Melanie Browns’ work is excellent!

“Once a year, go some place you’ve never gone before.” – Dali Lama

D.W.

Designing My Silk For Red Dress

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Our beautiful model: Marilyn Luscombe

 

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Fashion Designer Adrienne Goodine with our model!

 

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Detail shot!!  (Adrienne LOVES bows and cute details.)


Sometime in March.

I don’t know about you, but  when I have an important project to do, or something that will take a lot of work, I procrastinate.  WHY do I do this!?

This year Adrienne Goodine asked me to design and dye silk for her red dress for the annual Red Dress Fashion Show which is a fundraiser for the Heart and Stroke Foundation.  I knew that tie dyed silk would not stand out amongst the rest of the other gorgeous hand made dresses.  So I decided to hand paint three meters of yardage with my signature roses.  WHY DID I THINK THIS WOULD BE A GOOD IDEA!?  It’s not.  Setting up the frame to stretch out my silk takes forever!!  Not to mention I have to find a space to do this first. UGH!  Now that I am writing this I have answered my own question as to why I am procrastinating dying this fabric…

March. 21st
Update!  I cleared a spot in my living room and finally started dying my silk (hooray!) now for the bad news…the news that always seems to follow when you’re me and you’re a surface designer.  There is always an obstacle to over come, always a barrier to break down, always a problem to fix.  My “scarlet red” dye is looking more pink than red.  WHHHHYYYY!?  I have painted one and a half meters of silk THREE TIMES now, and it finally looks somewhat red.  I am worried about what it is going to look like once I rinse and wash it out.  Oh well, another problem for another day really. lol

March. 25th
Silk is painted, steamed, rinsed and washed!!!  It turned out red (hooray!)

April. 3rd
As well as the red roses, I have to dye a piece of silk that is solid red.  Guess what…I ran out of dye!

Sometime in April
Thankfully I finally finished dyeing all of the silk and it turned out RED, thank gosh!  I will post more pictures soon on my instagram or facebook account, but I would love to know what everyone thinks about how the dress turned out!

“My head says, “who cares?” but then my heart whispers, “You do, stupid…””

D.W.

Dee Wilkie – The Art Project Does Jamaica: Sueno Swimwear

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In a recent article that was published, it came out that Victoria’s Secret will no longer be selling bikinis.  (Insert freak out here.)  Don’t worry men and women everywhere, I have found the solution!

Sueno Swimwear is a Nova Scotia based company that sells custom made swimwear.  Sueno takes care of ALL the details, and although having a hand made bathing suit might SOUND iffy, I assure you, Seuno has the bathing suit making business down to a science!!  (For example, even the bottoms you buy come with a sticker on the…crotch…area to ensure sanitation and professionalism.)

The best part about Sueno swimwears’ bikinis? …Where do I start?!  They are completely customizable for one.  Joanna Tranter (the founder of Sueno Swimwear) asked that I send her my measurements which were so easy to take I took them by myself!  Then I got to pick the design I wanted.  (Sueno Swimwear already has tons of both cute and sexy swimwear to choose from, but I really wanted something specific for our trip.)

Secondly, Joanna designs the swimwear to not only to be fashionable, but also to be functional.  Joanna is a surfer, so she understands the importance of having a bathing suit that doesn’t fall off.  While we were in Jamaica we had the awesome experience of traveling up Dunns River Falls.  Our tour guides warned us time and time again to make sure our bathing suits were secure so they would not fall off.  Needless to say, out of all the things I was worried about while traveling up a 55m rushing waterfall, having my bottoms fall off was not one of them.  (AND they were not super tight causing a muffin top.  They legit just fit really well.)

My biggest regret about Sueno Swimwear?  I wish I had ordered a custom top to go with my super cute and comfy bottoms!

To order one of Sueno Swimwears suits, check out their website here.

“Life is too short to wear boring swimsuits.”

D.W.

 

Dee Wilkie – The Art Project, Does Jamaica: Michelle Duncan

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Tank top: Dainty Hooligan, Michelle Duncan, Dee Wilkie.  Shorts: Eclipse.  Heels: Spring.

Have you ever ordered something that looks super cute online and then when it finally gets to you it just doesn’t look quite right?  Maybe it’s still nice enough that you keep it and wear it occasionally, but it doesn’t look as good as you had hoped.  Or you get it and the size is wrong, or the fabric isn’t what you thought it would be or it just isn’t what you wanted.  I think most girls are probably organized enough that they would just send these garments back and get a new size or their money back, but to me that just seems like a headache.

While getting ready for my trip down south, I realized my wardrobe was in major need of some sprucing up.  I have a million racer back tanks and hoodies, but nothing that would look cute with heels.  My friend Sara introduced me to this super cute online store called Dainty Hooligan.  They have SO MANY CUTE CLOTHES!!!  I especially love their tank tops and dresses.  So I ordered two dresses, a tank top, (and of course the essential “sticky bra”.)  The dresses came in and fit like a glove.  The tank top on the other hand just wasn’t quite right.  I LOVED the back of it and didn’t want to send it back, but the chest area was…not flattering to say the least.

THANKFULLY I have some pretty great fashion friends.  I messaged Michelle Duncan, one of my most trusted fashion designers here in Fredericton and she reconstructed my tank with my own screen printed silk.  It turned out to be one of my favourite tops on my trip!  Basically all Michelle did was take apart the tank top and add a new front with my custom made silk and VIOLLA!  I got to keep the super cool back AND I now only have two boobs when I wear the top and not four.  It was a win win really.

If you would like to see more of Michelles’ work and to get a sneak peak of her new up and coming line, click here.

“Before something great happens, everything falls apart.” – Anon

D.W.